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Hassan S. Salehi Publishes Research Paper in "Journal of the Optical Society of America A"


Posted 03/16/2016
Category: Accolades
2D fluence distribution inside the hemisphere at different y intercepts from the semi-infinite solution (top row), the gradient descent estimator solution with five imaginary sources (middle row), and the Monte Carlo modeling (bottom row).

2D fluence distribution inside the hemisphere at different y intercepts from the semi-infinite solution (top row), the gradient descent estimator solution with five imaginary sources (middle row), and the Monte Carlo modeling (bottom row).

Umar Alqasemi, PhD, assistant professor of engineering at King Abdulaziz University; Hassan S. Salehi, PhD, visiting assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, CETA; and Quing Zhu, PhD, professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Connecticut (UCONN), have published a research article in the Journal of the Optical Society of America A (JOSA A) Vol. 33, No. 2, February 2016. The JOSA A is devoted to developments in any field of classical optics, image science, and vision. This journal includes original peer-reviewed papers on such topics as atmospheric optics, clinical vision, coherence and statistical optics, color, diffraction and gratings, image processing, machine vision, physiological optics, polarization, scattering, signal processing, thin films, and visual optics.

This paper, "Method for estimating closed-form solutions of the light diffusion equation for turbid media of any boundary shape," reports a method of estimating an approximate closed-form solution to the light diffusion equation for any type of geometry involving Dirichlet’s boundary condition with known source location. It is based on estimating the optimum locations of multiple imaginary point sources to cancel the fluence at the extrapolated boundary by constrained optimization using a genetic algorithm. The mathematical derivation of the problem to approach the optimum solution for the direct-current type of diffuse optical systems is described in detail. Our method is first applied to slab geometry and compared with a truncated series solution. After that, it is applied to hemispherical geometry and compared with Monte Carlo simulation results. The method provides a fast and sufficiently accurate fluence distribution for optical reconstruction.

This research is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH R01CA151570)

2D fluence distribution inside the hemisphere at different y intercepts from the semi-infinite solution (top row), the gradient descent estimator solution with five imaginary sources (middle row), and the Monte Carlo modeling (bottom row).

2D fluence distribution inside the hemisphere at different y intercepts from the semi-infinite solution (top row), the gradient descent estimator solution with five imaginary sources (middle row), and the Monte Carlo modeling (bottom row).