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Hassan Salehi Publishes Paper at SPIE Photonics West International Conference in Collaboration with UCONN and Stony Brook University


Posted 02/17/2017
Category: Accolades
Figure 1: OCT images of five different ex vivo tissues: (a) human enamel, (b) human cortical bone, (c) human trabecular bone, (d) rat masseteric muscle, and (e) fatty tissue.

Figure 1: OCT images of five different ex vivo tissues: (a) human enamel, (b) human cortical bone, (c) human trabecular bone, (d) rat masseteric muscle, and (e) fatty tissue.

Figure 2: Normalized mean Radon transform over the range of 0 deg to 90 deg, along with the fitted Gaussian model for the OCT images of five ex vivo tissues.

Figure 2: Normalized mean Radon transform over the range of 0 deg to 90 deg, along with the fitted Gaussian model for the OCT images of five ex vivo tissues.

Dr. Hassan S. Salehi, electrical and computer engineering faculty member at the University of Hartford's College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture (CETA) published a research paper at the SPIE Photonics West International Conference, held in San Francisco, January 28-February 2, 2017. The paper, "Characterization of human oral tissues based on quantitative analysis of optical coherence tomography images," was written by lead author Dr. Salehi along with CETA faculty member Ali Kosa, Stony Brook assistant professor Dr. Mina Mahdian, CETA Assistant Dean Dr. Saeid Moslehpour, CETA Associate Dean Dr. Hisham Alnajjar, and UCONN Health Center assistant professor Dr. Aditya Tadinada.
 
The paper describes a new feature extraction method using advanced image processing techniques for early detection of pathologic changes in tissues. Based on the observed texture differences between optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of soft and hard tissues, spatial and spectral features were quantitatively extracted from the OCT images. The Radon transform from angles of 0 deg to 90 deg was computed, averaged over all the angles, normalized to peak at unity, and then fitted with Gaussian function. The mean absolute values of the spatial frequency components of the OCT image were considered as a feature, where 2-D fast Fourier transform (FFT) was done to OCT images. These OCT features can reliably differentiate between a range of hard and soft tissues, and could be extremely valuable in assisting dentists for in vivo evaluation of oral tissues and early detection of pathologic changes in tissues, which would result in more successful treatment outcome.
 
In this research project, Dr. Salehi is closely working with his collaborators, Dr. Mina Mahdian, assistant professor and program director at Stony Brook University School of Dental Medicine, and Dr. Aditya Tadinada, assistant professor at University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC) to develop the optical imaging technology. Dr. Salehi and his colleagues have now established an interdisciplinary team composed of multiple clinicians with expertise in diagnostic imaging and an engineer with background in image processing, computer vision, optical imaging modalities, and lasers.
 
Figure 1: OCT images of five different ex vivo tissues: (a) human enamel, (b) human cortical bone, (c) human trabecular bone, (d) rat masseteric muscle, and (e) fatty tissue.

Figure 1: OCT images of five different ex vivo tissues: (a) human enamel, (b) human cortical bone, (c) human trabecular bone, (d) rat masseteric muscle, and (e) fatty tissue.

Figure 2: Normalized mean Radon transform over the range of 0 deg to 90 deg, along with the fitted Gaussian model for the OCT images of five ex vivo tissues.

Figure 2: Normalized mean Radon transform over the range of 0 deg to 90 deg, along with the fitted Gaussian model for the OCT images of five ex vivo tissues.