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The Evolving Notion of Musical Composition


Posted 04/18/2017
Submitted by Brian Skelly
Category: Campus Announcements

Join us at this week’s Philosophy Club meeting Thursday, April 20th, from 12:15 to 1:45 in 421 Auerbach Hall as Club member and sound composer Maria Mykolenko, soon to be recipient of an Artist's Diploma from The Hartt School, presents reflections on the evolution of the process of music composition in human history. Her discussion will review the evolution of musical language and notation as well as the evolving structures of music and the changing conceptions of the role music plays in society, including music's relationship to gender, the role of the audience, and the composer-performer relationship. 

Sound artist and composer Maria Mykolenko is in her last semester of the Artist Diploma in Composition program at The Hartt School at the University of Hartford. Maria holds an M.A. in Composition from the Aaron Copland School of Music at Queens College, CUNY and an MFA in Music/sound from Bard College. Maria also has a liberal arts background in economics and philosophy. Her interests include electroacoustic soundscapes as well as chamber music and and choral music. At The Hartt School she has studied with David Macbride, Robert Carl and Ken Steen. Her work has been performed in a variety of musical venues including, most recently, the New York City Electroacoustic Music Festival. Other interests include political sound art and the connections between musical and social forms and structures.

The University of Hartford Philosophy Club meets every Thursday during Fall and Spring Semesters - with the exception of the first Thursday of each semester - from 12:15 to 1:45 in 421 Auerbach Hall on the campus of the University of Hartford. The Club has an informal, jovial atmosphere. It is a place where students, professors, and people from the community at large meet as peers Sometimes presentations are given, followed by discussion. Other times, topics are hashed out by the whole group.

Presenters may be students, professors, or people from the community. Anyone can offer to present a topic. The mode of presentation may be as formal or informal as the presenter chooses. Bring friends. Suggest topics and activities. Take over the club! It belongs to you! Food and drink are served. Come and go as you wish.

For more information, contact Brian Skelly at bskelly@hartford.edu or 413-642-0334.