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NOMA Lecture Event on Thursday, September 7


Posted 09/06/2017
Submitted by Katrina Mill
Category: Campus Announcements, Student Announcements

NOMA EVENT

Ride share to Lecture? Email Ted sawruk@hartford.edu Leaving 4:30 K lot

Black Matter”

Lecture: Scott Ruff

Scott Ruff is the Louis I. Kahn Visiting Assistant Professor.

Thursday, September 7, 2017 - 6:30pm

Lectures and talks begin at 6:30pm in Hastings Hall (basement) unless otherwise noted.

Doors open to the general public at 6:15pm.

 

Location

Hastings Hall

180 York Street

New Haven, CT 06511

Born in Buffalo, New York, Ruff, received his first professional Bachelors of Architecture degree from Cornell University (1992) and a Masters of Architecture II from Cornell University (1995). He has taught at Syracuse University and Hampton University, as an Assistant Professor and the State University of New York at Buffalo, and Cornell University as a Lecturer.  Scott Ruff is the principal of RuffWorks Studio, a research and design studio specializing in culturally informed projects and community engagement. RuffWorks Studio’s focus is on design methods that embrace social responsibility as the studio works with clients to reach their goals for every project. Professor Ruff is currently working on a forth-coming book, “In Search of African-American Space”, Routledge Press. Other publications include articles in Thresholds, “Signifiyin: An African-American Language to Landscape”, Spatial ‘w Rapping’: A Speculation on Men’s Hip-Hop Fashion”, and a book review in the Journal of Architectural Education, “White Papers, Black Marks.” Professor Ruff has lectured and exhibited throughout the United States and Internationally, selected exhibits include:  The Dresser Trunk Project”, “Landscapes and Interiors”, “Whispers Down the Lane”, Translations”,  Drawn – In”. Selected lectures include Secrets of the Cloth, Education of an Architect: Through African-American Constructs, Diversity in Architecture, and Working Neighborhoods: Working the Spirit.