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CETA Faculty King, Slaboch, and Tatoglu Present Work at International Conference


Posted 11/16/2017
Category: Accolades
Left to Right: Slaboch, King and Tatoglu

Left to Right: Slaboch, King and Tatoglu

CETA faculty Dr. Eoin King, Dr. Paul Slaboch, and Dr. Akin Tatoglu published and presented a total of five papers at the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exhibition (IMECE) in Tampa, FL during the week of Nov 5-9. The IMECE is one of the largest conferences of its type drawing a crowd of approximately 2500 professional, governmental and academic researchers to discuss the latest progress in mechanical engineering. Dr. King contributed to two presented papers, Dr. Tatoglu contributed to three papers, and Dr. Slaboch presented one paper and served as a session organizer. Their collective work featured a wide range of topics from acoustics to robotics to energy generation devices and includes a cooperative research effort with four different organizations.

King’s work was featured on two papers. The first paper was titled “Using Acoustic Waves to Modulate Stem Cell Growth and Differentiation” and included a number of University of Hartford Students as co-authors, along with Dr. Andrea Kwaczala, Western New England University. This paper presented the results of a study investigating if acoustic waves could be used to induce osteogenic differentiation when applied to stem cells.

Slaboch’s paper, “Design and Analysis of Small Scale Horizontal Archimedean Screw for Electric Power Generation” focused on an experimental, parametric design of horizontal augers for power generation. The study, written in conjunction with a colleague at St. Martin’s University in Lacey, WA, looked at the effects of varying the blade pitch, geometry, and outer casing of the auger on the efficiency of the system. 

Tatoglu’s “Autonomous Mobile Robotics Research Group” focuses on designing and developing alternate locomotion mechanisms with agile maneuver capabilities, implementation of their visual localization and motion control systems. He presented three papers. The first paper discusses advancements of his novel design of a flying craft: “Parameter Identification and Closed Loop Control of a Flywheel Mounted Hovering Robot”. His second paper presents a data analytics methodology which studies relationship between different content delivery approaches: “Investigating the Involvement of Self-Directed Learning in Flipped Classrooms: A Unique URL-Based Search Method”. This multi-institution research work includes co-authors from Farmingdale State College, Dr. Gonca Altuger-Genc and Pace University, Dr. Yegin Genc.

In 2016, external research funding was awarded to King and Tatoglu, along with Dr. Robert Celmer (CETA) by the Paul S. Veneklasen Research Foundation. A major deliverable of this research, “Participatory Noise Mapping: Harnessing the Potential of Smartphones Through the Development of a Dedicated Citizen-Science Platform” was also presented. This paper describes the development of a platform for citizen science noise mapping that could lead to massive noise mapping studies.

Left to Right: Slaboch, King and Tatoglu

Left to Right: Slaboch, King and Tatoglu