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Wright, Milanovic, and Eppes Publish a Paper at ASEE Salt Lake City Conference


Posted 05/31/2018
Category: Accolades
Fig. 1: Student work using COMSOL Multiphysics® software: "Water Purification Reactor".

Fig. 1: Student work using COMSOL Multiphysics® software: "Water Purification Reactor".

Fig. 2: Impact of Collaborative Project (CP) on Thermodynamics I Students

Fig. 2: Impact of Collaborative Project (CP) on Thermodynamics I Students

Fig. 3: Impact of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) and previous Thermodynamics I CP experience on Students in Fluid Mechanics.

Fig. 3: Impact of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) and previous Thermodynamics I CP experience on Students in Fluid Mechanics.

Kamau Wright, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, Ivana Milanovic, professor of mechanical engineering, and Tom Eppes, professor of electrical engineering, published the paper, “Implementing Collaborative Projects Using a National Academy  of Engineering (NAE) Grand Challenge: Provide Access to Clean  Water,”at the 125th American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Annual Conference and Exposition in Salt Lake City, in June 2018. 

The ASEE Annual Conference is the only conference dedicated to all disciplines of engineering education. As the premier event of its kind, the ASEE conference is committed to fostering the exchange of ideas and enhancing teaching methods and curricula. The conference features more than 400 technical sessions, with peer-reviewed papers spanning all disciplines of engineering education.

The paper presents the results of the authors’ work in thermo-fluids and simulation courses. Dr. Wright implemented a Collaborative Project (CP) with a simulation component, as a High Impact Practice into a Thermodynamics I course. Data collected in post-requisite Thermodynamics II and Fluid Mechanics courses indicated that CP students were more likely than non-CP students to express that they understood thermodynamics, liked thermo-fluid courses, and were excited to use simulations. Students that were re-exposed to the use of COMSOL Multiphysics® in Fluid Mechanics with Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) component were even more likely to express affinity for thermo-fluid courses and future use of engineering software, with the CP students in those sections expressing the most positive responses.

Fig. 1: Student work using COMSOL Multiphysics® software: "Water Purification Reactor".

Fig. 1: Student work using COMSOL Multiphysics® software: "Water Purification Reactor".

Fig. 2: Impact of Collaborative Project (CP) on Thermodynamics I Students

Fig. 2: Impact of Collaborative Project (CP) on Thermodynamics I Students

Fig. 3: Impact of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) and previous Thermodynamics I CP experience on Students in Fluid Mechanics.

Fig. 3: Impact of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) and previous Thermodynamics I CP experience on Students in Fluid Mechanics.